Why people share – Content Marketing…

hollerlab —  May 1, 2013 — Leave a comment

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A recent report published by the New York times, Consumer Insight Division has attempted to dissect and contextualise the reasons people share content and the types of behaviours and personality traits they exhibit. The report delves into the channels and digital platforms that different archetypes will be drawn to, to share content with their friends and peers. They have broken down the report into 2 key sections, one covering the drivers that influence people to share and then categorising different groups, the kinds of content they are more likely to share and the channels they will be drawn to share across. Here is a breakdown of the reports findings on the key reasons that people share content with their networks:

  • To disseminate valuable and entertaining content
  • Content that fuels and projects our identity
  • To make us feel connected
  • Self fulfillment and social reassurance
  • To project brands and causes people are attached to

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To distil that down, peoples disposition to share comes down to their relationships with the people and peers around them. Essentially the reason people share is it allows them to project and share content that reflects their personality, generates social kudos, could be valuable to friends and peers and helps inform those around them about who they are and who they want to be. So, this is nothing new, but it brings us back to the point that what we need to do is interrogate our executions to ensure that we are producing interactions that are useful, relevant and entertaining as well as ensuring the outputs of those interactions meet the same criteria. This will ensure that we generate a disproportionate share of voice within our consumer’s online conversations.

As aforementioned the report also identified a number of persona’s, six to be exact, and the type of content as well as the mediums that they would be most likely to share across. The personas themselves are:

  1. Altruists – HELPFUL, RELIABLE, E-MAIL, THOUGHTFUL, CONNECTED
  2. Careerists – LINKEDIN, VALUABLE, INTELLIGENT, NETWORK
  3. Hipsters – LESS LIKELY TO E-MAIL, CUTTING EDGE CREATIVE, IDENTITY,
    YOUNG, POPULAR
  4. Boomerangs – REACTION, VALIDATION, EMPOWERED, TWITTER, FACEBOOK
  5. Connectors – CREATIVE, RELAXED, THOUGHTFUL, MAKING PLANS, E-MAIL, FACEBOOK
  6. Selectives – RESOURCEFUL, CAREFUL, THOUGHTFUL, INFORMATIVE, E-MAIL

We feel the above segmentation is particularly helpful as a guide to align against (albeit based on American research) existing segmentation studies. It will invariably help to identify the types of content that a particular consumer will react to and the types of channels that should be prioritised for both delivery, response and sharing. Ensuring we increase our chance of generating social buzz by reducing the friction of sharing for a particular persona, using their preferred communications medium.

In essence It all comes back to content marketing in the end and the ability that content has to really tap into the needs, behaviours and personalities of our target markets. Which is by no means a new phenomena. Just exacerbated by the increasing access people have to the web and the ability this provides consumers to share ‘more content, from more sources, with more people, more often, more quickly’.

We often talk here at Holler about the ability good creative, or well interrogated outputs can enhance the effectiveness and social credibility of a campaign. I suppose the study that the New York Times has done helps to support that argument. Give people things of value, that is relevant to people like them and their networks and they will invariably be compelled to share.

Definitely worth a read: http://nytmarketing.whsites.net/mediakit/pos/

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